I’ve Been Diagnosed With Sensory Over Responsivity

Standard

My life after Alcoholics Anonymous

I saw both my counselor and psychiatric nurse yesterday in order to address my treatment-resistant depression, anxiety and other symptoms. My counseling session was difficult, but my session with my psychiatric nurse is better. In the end, I’ve been diagnosed with Sensory Over Responsivity, which can lead to what is called “sensory overload” or “sensory meltdown”.

My counseling session was frustrating as my counselor asks me a lot of questions to determine how to help me. I finally just decided to say “I don’t know” to my counselor’s questions when I didn’t know the answer. She, for example, asked if I can think of a good time in my life when I felt confident and reassured when I am depressed and what that good time would be. I thought about it and told her that college and graduate school were good times of my life. Then she asks me to…

View original post 687 more words

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “I’ve Been Diagnosed With Sensory Over Responsivity

  1. Thanks! My boyfriend is actually very similar to your partner. I would describe him as steady. He is also mild-mannered but he does tend to try to interfere by fixing. We are working on that. And in terms of counseling right now I’m not doing it at all, which I think is good because I’m just getting back onto my feet after being given all of these new diagnoses and starting new medications. I started taking Clonidine for ADHD and sensory issues and my meltdowns are markedly decreased.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. ….it would seem that your counsellor/therapist’s questions are useful and good ones, yet for anyone experiencing depression, difficult to answer in any detail except with ‘I don’t know’. My sexual abuse was weekly over a three year period when I was about 9 or so. It resulted in maybe five different therapists, a divorce, and finally coming out of the closet. My partner and I have now been together 15 years. His mild-mannered, non-interfering personality is all the therapy I need, or perhaps ever needed. But I do take medications for good sleep. My hope and prayer is that you get the best combination of understanding and calm support, along with setting yourself low bars for getting through your days and nights. Survivors need good pillows and lots of comfort (and tea and toast any time of day or night).

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much for sharing. So glad that your life turned around in a good way! I also like the idea of the need for comforting activities for survivors of abuse. I have heard this before, but it felt better coming from someone who has been there. I was sexually abused also. One of my abusers was my father. In my imagination, there is a hill that I am trying to get over but when I get to the top, I slide back down. I try to imagine that the hill is not steep, and that I do not slide all the way back down. Anyway, I will think of you when I concentrate on comforting myself today.

      Oh, and I didn’t write this post, but reposted it because I identified with it so much and thought others would too. Please go to the original post to contact the original writer.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s